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Microsoft word - abstract to content vol. 4 _1_.docx

                                                                             Journal of Plant Development Sciences
(An International Quarterly Refereed Research Journal)
Contents
REVIEW ARTICLE

Black cumin (Nigella sativa L.) – A Review
— Animesh K. Datta, Aditi Saha, Arnab Bhattacharya, Aninda Mandal, Rita Paul and Sonali S.
RESEARCH ARTICLES
Seed biology of Artemisia maritima L. an overexploited medicinally important species in north west himalayas —Jyoti Parihar, Uma Bharti, Irshad Ahmed Hamal and Namrata Sharma.45-48
Regeneration status and species diversity along the fire gradients in tropical deciduous forest of Chhattisgarh —M. K. Jhariya and P. R. Oraon.49-54
Tree layer composition and carbon content of Oak and Pine in Lohaghat forests of Kumaun himalaya —Neelu Lodhiyal and L.S. Lodhiyal.55-62
Morphological and cytological studies in Nigella sativa L. and N. damascena L. (Ranunculaceae) —Aditi Saha and Animesh Kumar Datta.63-67
Mycorrhizal inoculation effect on growth responses and dry mass production of Mimosa himalayana gamble seedlings —Kiran Bargali and S. S. Bargali..69-72
Analysis of qualitative traits in Okra [Abelmoschus esculentus (L.) Moench] grown under two environments —Sankara Rao Karri and Pinaki Acharyya.73-76
Adoption of eco-friendly management practices by vegetable growers —Ramadhar Pyasi, Aparna Jaiswal and P.C Chaurasia.77-80
Some studies on physical and chemical properties of Tamarind at different moisture content —Amit Kumar Sinha, S. Patel and P.L. Choudhary.81-84
Distribution of trace metals in drinking water of some rural habitations in western Uttar Pradesh, India and their suitability for drinking purpose —Renu Chaudhary and Veena Chaudhary.85-88
Effect of treatment with lead sulphate on soil mycobiota —Pradip Kumar and M.U. Charaya.89-
Structure and phenology of an alpine meadow as affected by nomadic grazing —Prem Prakash, A. K. Paliwal and C.J. Prabhakar..95-99
Evaluation of the antibacterial activity of bark of Litchi chinensis against escherichia coli, a uti causing organism —V.K. Deshwal , K. Vig , S.B. Singh and P.D. Devi.101-103
Efficiency of untreated and treated dairy effluent on physico-chemical properties of the soil —Gulfam Ali and M.K. Abdulla.105-109
Ethnoveterinary values of some plants used against snake bite in Poonch district of Jammu and Kashmir (India) —Jameel Ahmed Khan and Sudhir Kumar.111-114
Bioprospecting anticarcinogenic potential of plants in Rajasthan, India —Lokendra Singh, Pracheta, Veena Sharma and Ritu Paliwal.115-123
SHORT COMMUNICATIONS
Role of bio-fertilizers in Horticultural crops —Sankara Rao Karri.125-129
Problems experienced by rural women entrepreneurs —Aparna Jaiswal, M.M. Patel and P.C. Chaurasia.131-132
Post harvest life of tuberose as influence by GA3 and varieties —Priyanka Sharma and Anil Kumar Singh.133-134
Screening of Okra genotypes based on leaf shape index —Sankara Rao Karri and Pinaki Acharyya.135-136
Reveiw Article
BLACK CUMIN (NIGELLA SATIVA L.) – A REVIEW
Animesh K. Datta1*, Aditi Saha2, Arnab Bhattacharya1, Aninda Mandal1, Rita Paul3
and Sonali S.4
1. Department of Botany, Cytogenetics and Plant Breeding Section, Kalyani University, Kalyani 741235, West Bengal, India 2. Department of Botany, Narasinha Dutt College, Howrah 711101 3. Charuchandra College, Department of Botany, Kolkata 700029 4. P.G. Department of Botany, Hooghly Mohsin College, Hooghly 712101 *Corresponding author email: dattaanimesh@gmail.com Abstract: Black cumin (Nigella sativa L., Family: Ranunculaceae) is an annual herb possessing wide range of medicinal
uses apart from its commercial significance as a spice yielding plant. Black cumin seeds are used in folk (herbal) medicine
all over the world for the treatment and prevention of a number of diseases. Prophet Mohammad (Peace be Upon Him) said:
"Use this Black Seed; it has a cure for every disease except death" (Sahih Bukhari). The plant species is also important
cytogenetically and may be used as a model plant for better understanding of gene and chromosome relationship. Despite the
major advancement of modern medicine in human health-care, it is still intangible and beyond reach to ailing humanity,
especially the destitute and therefore in recent years plant based system has been utilized for traditional medicine and
phytotherapy. 'Medicinal plants are gift of nature' and black cumin is one such plant with potential uses, which can be
explore for safe and effective herbal medicine for human benefit. Considering nearly all essential aspects of the species
(synonym(s), common names, origin of the name, distribution, varieties, plant description, floral biology, pollination
biology, scanning electron microscopy of seed surfaces, cultivation, economy, diseases, pest, microscopical and powdered
characteristics, biochemical constituents, extraction methods of essential oils, therapeutic uses, insecticidal activity, other
uses, clinical trials, biosafety, tissue culture and patents), a monograph is prepared on the laid formulation of WHO (World
Health Organization) as well as on other significant parameters (cytogenetics and molecular genetics) with the following
objectives: to provide an unabridged repository of references regarding the species for its effective and safe utilization as a
'Potential Medicinal Herb'; for creating awareness regarding the use of plant based medicine; understanding economic status,
biosafety and patents for regulating herbal medicinal market Nationally and Internationally and exploration of cytogenetical
and genetical aspects.

Keywords:
Black cumin, Herbal medicine, Nigella sativa
Journal of Plant Development Sciences Vol. 4 (1) SEED BIOLOGY OF ARTEMISIA MARITIMA L. AN OVEREXPLOITED
MEDICINALLY IMPORTANT SPECIES IN NORTH WEST HIMALAYAS
Jyoti Parihar, Uma Bharti, Irshad Ahmed Hamal* and Namrata Sharma**
Department of Botany, University of Jammu, Jammu- 180006, India *Baba Ghulab Shah Badshah University, Rajouri, J & K **e-mail—phyllanthus@rediffmail.com Abstract: Artemisia maritima of family Compositae is an endangered perennial shrub with localized distribution because of
its being highly habitat specific (Parihar et al., 2011). Plants forming natural populations in Kishtwar Himalayas in J&K
state, India, show high fruit and seed set in open fields (x =83.7%). Details of floral structure and events of floral biology
reveal the species to be outcrossed, although it has the capacity to set seeds by selfing also. The same is accomplished
through geitonogamy and by self pollen germinating at the point of nectary capping the ovary (Parihar et al. 2009).Seeds of
the species, one per fruit , is with straight embryo and unique in being of two different colors , grey and brown. Both types
are alike morphologically but differ in weight. On a moist filter paper, the %age of seeds germinating averages 34.33% for
grey seeds and 47.5% for brown seeds. Most of the seedlings emerging out of these seeds however fail to establish. These
observations reveal the manifestation of inbreeding depression in the species. This outcrossed species is supposedly forced to
set seed by selfing due to squeezing of populations due to overexploitation and by a single individual occupying
considerable area due to perennation for several years.
Keywords: Artemisia maritima, Seed
Journal of Plant Development Sciences Vol. 4 (1) REGENERATION STATUS AND SPECIES DIVERSITY ALONG THE FIRE
GRADIENTS IN TROPICAL DECIDUOUS FOREST OF CHHATTISGARH
M. K. Jhariya* and P. R. Oraon
Department of Forestry, College of Agriculture, I.G.K.V., Raipur (Chhattisgarh) *Author for correspondence: manu9589@gmail.com
Abstract:
The present work aimed to study the impact or behavior of forest fire on regeneration status and diversity indices.
Four sites were selected; in each of these sites pre-fire and post-fire observation were taken for measuring varying degree of
disturbances. A total of 19 seedlings species were recorded during pre-fire season and 14 seedlings species were recorded
during post-fire season, respectively. Along the fire gradients the tree species exhibited highest density of seedlings in low
fire zone. It showed that non-fire zone contained more species as compared to burnt areas. The diversity pattern showed that
the medium fire zone had maximum diversity followed by non-fire zone, whereas low fire zone had minimum Shannon
index. Seedling density drastically reduced after post-fire (27.63%). In the high fire zone the seedling layer was much
affected which will result discontinuation of conversion into sapling with the progress of time and ultimately the gap in the
regeneration status.

Keywords:
Diversity, Forest fire, Pre-fire, Post-fire, Regeneration

Journal of Plant Development Sciences Vol. 4 (1) TREE LAYER COMPOSITION AND CARBON CONTENT OF OAK AND PINE IN
LOHAGHAT FORESTS OF KUMAUN HIMALAYA
Neelu Lodhiyal1 and L.S. Lodhiyal2
1Department of Botany, DSB Campus, Kumaun University, Nainital-263002, UK 2Department of Forestry, DSB Campus, Kumaun University, Nainital-263002, UK
Abstract: Present study deals with composition of tree species, biomass and carbon content of forests in Lohaghat
(Champawat) in Kumaun Himalaya. Total 06 tree species were reported from the study forest sites i.e. Quercus
leucotrichophora, Pinus roxburghii, Cedrus deodara, Myrica esculenta, Prunus cerasoides and Xanthoxylum alatum
. The
Quercus leucotrichophora was dominant tree (82.7%) in the study forest site. Oak tree shared maximum basal area
(24.96m2ha-1) and important value index (210.72). Total density of trees, seedlings and saplings was 2860 ind ha-1. Of this,
tree, seedling and sapling shared 46.5, 21.0 and 32.5 percent. The biomass and carbon content of oak and pine was 128.10 t
ha-1 and 72.87 t ha-1, respectively. Of these, oak trees shared 79.19 % biomass and 81.5 % carbon, respectively. The findings
of density, basal area, biomass and carbon content depicted that forest is in young stage with less number of tree species,
needs a proper management and conservation so that tree layer species composition, biomass and carbon stocks could be
increased.
Keywords:
Basal area, Biomass, Carbon content, Density, Tree species
Journal of Plant Development Sciences Vol. 4 (1) MORPHOLOGICAL AND CYTOLOGICAL STUDIES IN NIGELLA SATIVA L. AND
N. DAMASCENA L. (RANUNCULACEAE)
Aditi Saha2 and Animesh Kumar Datta*1
1-Department of Botany, Cytogenetics and Plant Breeding Section, Kalyani University, Kalyani – 741235, West Bengal, India 2-Department of Botany, Narasinha Dutt College, Howrah-711101 *Corresponding author e-mail: dattaanimesh@gmail.com Abstract: Nigella sativa L. (black cumin; potential herb with immense therapeutic uses apart from its spice yielding
property; cultivated variety – Persian Jewels) and Nigella damascena L. (commonly known as ‘love-in-a-mist’, grown in
gardens throughout temperate region of the world; cultivated variety – Miss Jekyll blue obtained from Sutton and Sons’,
Kolkata and an accession 0016287 obtained from Royal Botanical Garden, Kew, London) members of the family
Ranunculaceae were grown in the Experimental field plots of Department of Botany, Kalyani University (Nadia, West
Bengal plains, latitude 22°50´ to 24°11´ N, longitude 88°09´ to 88°48´ E, elevation 48 ft. above sea level, sandy loamy soil)
for three consecutive years as rabi crop. The plant types were described and Kew accession was found to be unique and
better adaptive than that of Sutton samples of N. damascena. Morphometric (plant height, primary and total branches/plant,
capsule/plant, capsule length, seta/capsule, filled seeds/capsule, seed weight/plant as well as capsule and flower sterilities)
and meiotic (mean chromosome association/cell at metaphase I, bivalent configurations, chiasma/nucleus, anaphase I
segregation and pollen fertility) parameters were assessed in the plant types and statistical analysis (χ2-test of heterogeneity
and Student t-test) of the accumulated data revealed significant variations among/between plant types for most of the traits.
Results indicated the possibility of efficient breeding between species/accessions for enhancing gene pool of Nigella.

Keywords:
Efficient breeding, Meiosis, Morphometric traits, Nigella damascena, Nigella sativa.
Journal of Plant Development Sciences Vol. 4 (1) MYCORRHIZAL INOCULATION EFFECT ON GROWTH RESPONSES AND DRY
MASS PRODUCTION OF MIMOSA HIMALAYANA GAMBLE SEEDLINGS
Kiran Bargali and S. S. Bargali
Department of Botany, Kumaun University, Nainital-263002, Uttarakhand Email: surendrakiran@rediffmail.com Abstract: Mimosa himalayana is a nitrogen fixing shrub of Central Himalayan region. In the present study, effect of
mycorrhizal inoculation was observed on the seedlings of M. himalayana. For this, seedlings of M. himalayana were raised
in polyethylene bags containing sterilized mixture of soil and commercial sand. The seedlings of M. himalayana became
colonized when inoculated with vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. When compared with uninoculated seedlings,
inoculated seedlings showed increased root and shoot length with 48% to 58% mycorrhizal dependency for total seedling
biomass. Present study suggested that the vesicular arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi act as an important biological factor that
contributes to the efficiency of nutrient uptake and use.

Keywords:
Colonization, Inoculation, Mimosa himalayana, Mycorrhiza, Production
Journal of Plant Development Sciences Vol. 4 (1) ANALYSIS OF QUALITATIVE TRAITS IN OKRA [ABELMOSCHUS ESCULENTUS
(L.) MOENCH] GROWN UNDER TWO ENVIRONMENTS
Sankara Rao Karri and Pinaki Acharyya  Department of Horticulture, Institute of Agricultural Science University of Calcutta, 35. Ballygunge Circular Road, Kolkata – 700019, India E-mail: ksrgreenplus@hotmail.com, pinakiacharyya@yahoo.co.in
Abstract:
Besides Okra is a potential fibre yielding crop as because the bast fibre is strong, hydroscopic and resistant to rot,
thus suitable to meet the global demand as an additional source of ecofriendly fibre. Fifteen genotypes of Okra were
evaluated for morphological and yield related traits. Estimation of biochemical constituents i.e. total soluble solids, crude
fibre, total cartenoids, calcium and phosphorus were also performed.

Keywords:
Abelmoschus esculentus, Analysis, Okara
Journal of Plant Development Sciences Vol. 4 (1) ADOPTION OF ECO-FRIENDLY MANAGEMENT PRACTICES BY VEGETABLE
Ramadhar Pyasi*, Aparna Jaiswal** & P.C Chaurasaia*
Department of Extension, Guru Ghashi Das University, Bilaspur (C.G.) Department of Horticulture, Indira Gandhi Krishi Vishwavidhayalaya, Raipur (C.G.) 

Abstract:
The investigation was undertaken during the year 2008-09 in purposively selected Indore block of Indore district
of Madhya Pradesh in terms of socio-personal, economic and communication profile of vegetable growers. Regarding the
knowledge about eco-friendly management practices most of the respondents possessed medium to high level of knowledge.
Higher percentage of the respondents (61.25%) had medium adoption of eco-friendly management practices. About 88.22
per cent variation in level of knowledge was contributed by all eleven antecedent variables related to socio-personal,
economic and communication characteristics of vegetable growers. Education, mass media exposure, extension participation
and information seeking behaviour were positively and significantly influenced the knowledge to the extent of 87.05 per
cent. Education showed its superiority over remaining variables in respect of influencing knowledge level. Education had
recorded highest percentile contribution (28.93) followed by mass media exposure (24.80), information seeking behaviour
(21.50) and extension participation (13.83). About 83 per cent variation in extent of adoption was explained by all eleven
antecedent variables. Education, mass media exposure, information seeking behaviour and land holding significantly
influenced the adoption of eco-friendly management practices by the vegetable growers to the extent of 80.83 per cent.
Education recorded highest percentile contribution (54.70) followed by mass media exposure (34.98) and information
seeking behaviour (21.59). Extent of adoption was negatively and significantly influenced by size of land holding to the
extent of –2.53 per cent in terms of percentile contribution towards multiple R2 value.
Keywords: Adoption, Management practices, Vegetable
Journal of Plant Development Sciences Vol. 4 (1) SOME STUDIES ON PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF TAMARIND
AT DIFFERENT MOISTURE CONTENT
Amit Kumar Sinha1, S. Patel1, and P.L. Choudhary2
1 Faculty of Agricultural Engineering, IGKV, Raipur (C.G.) 2 Department of Dairy Chemistry, CODT, Raipur (C.G.) Abstract: Tamarind (Tamarindus indica L) is an economically important fruit of India as well as Chhattisgarh. The
knowledge about physical and chemical properties like size, weight,moisture content, protein content, carbohydrate content
etc. of any biomaterial is essential to designing its equipment for processing , storage , transportation and for the value
addition. In the present investigation, some studies on physical and chemical properties of tamarind at different moisture
content were carried out. For the experiment physical and chemical properties were determined at three different moisture-
Initial 22.0%(wb), After sun drying 17.90%(wb), After hot air drying 15.80% (wb). physical properties of Tamarind fruit
like size, length, breadth, thickness and weight of fruit (pulp weight, seed weight, shell weight etc) followed a declining
trend with decrease in moisture content of the tamarind fruit. The chemical properties like total soluble solids, protein
content, carbohydrate content, fat and ash content followed an increasing trend but the titratable acidity is decrease with
decreasing the moisture content of the fruits and the color of tamarind pulp was clearly observed that it became darker,
redder and yellowier than the initial and the total color (ΔE) difference at different treatments is 0, 5.807 and 6.458 under
normal, sun dried and hot air dried condition respectively.
Keywords: Tamarind, Physical & chemical properties
Journal of Plant Development Sciences Vol. 4 (1) DISTRIBUTION OF TRACE METALS IN DRINKING WATER OF SOME RURAL
HABITATIONS IN WESTERN UTTAR PRADESH, INDIA AND THEIR
SUITABILITY FOR DRINKING PURPOSE
Renu Chaudhary and Veena Chaudhary*
Deptt. of Chemistry, R.G. (P.G.) College, Meerut, U.P., India *Deptt. of Chemistry, C.S.S.S. (P.G.) College, Machhra, Meerut, U.P., India Abstract: A study was conducted to assess the distribution of manganese, copper zinc and iron in drinking water in some
part of western Uttar Pradesh. Ground water in the study area is neutral to moderately in nature. It was observed that the
ground water in the study area is having higher concentration of iron and zinc which is vulnerable to drink. Iron was much
higher than the acceptable limit in approximately 59% of water sample as per guide line of (WHO) However, the
concentration of zinc were permissible limit but it was much higher than acceptable limit as per EPA guideline. The
concentration of copper and manganese was within the limit. The suitability of ground water for drinking purpose were
examined using WHO and EPA classification, which indicate that ground water, was unsuitable for drinking purpose in few
location.

Keywords
: Trace metals, Drinking water, Manganese, Copper, Zinc, Iron
Journal of Plant Development Sciences Vol. 4 (1) EFFECT OF TREATMENT WITH LEAD SULPHATE ON SOIL MYCOBIOTA
Pradip Kumar and M.U. Charaya
Microbiology Laboratory, Department of Botany, CCS University, Meerut- 250 005
Abstract:
Nineteen species of fungi were isolated from control soils and that treated with lead sulphate solutions (20ppm,
40ppm, 100ppm and 250ppm) for 90 days. Treatment with lead sulphate did not result in substantial decrease in the number
of species isolated. Greater number of isolates was obtained from Pb-treated soils except in general. The species which could
tolerate higher concentration of lead sulphate for 90 days included Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus ustus, Aspergillus niger
and Trichoderma lignorum. Aspergillus fumigatus and Botryotrichum piluliferum exhibited remarkable resistance to lead as
these dominated the soil treated with lead sulphate solution for 90 days.
Keywords: Heavy metals, Lead pollution, Metal tolerant fungi, Soil microflora.
Journal of Plant Development Sciences Vol. 4 (1) STRUCTURE AND PHENOLOGY OF AN ALPINE MEADOW AS AFFECTED BY
NOMADIC GRAZING
Prem Prakash, A. K. Paliwal1 and C. J. Prabhakar2
Deptt. of Botany, Govt. P.G. College, Dwarahat, Almora (Uttarakhand) 1 Deptt of Botany, Govt. P.G. College, Bageshwar (Uttarakhand) 2 MSSO, Central Silk Board, Guwahati (Assam) Abstract: Data were collected for structure and phenology of alpine grassland at Rudranath in Uttarakhand, India. A large
number of species of the area are dwarf cushion herbs and most are distributed in mid alpine tract. A total of 21 and 16 species were recorded at control (S1) and grazed (S2) plot respectively. At control or ungrazed site maximum density (211.0 pl/m2) and basal cover (121.6 pl/m2) was recorded for Danthonia cachyymeriana and for grazed plot maximum density (146.0 pl/m2) and basal cover (170.9 pl/m2) was for Oxygraphis polypatela. In most of the cases, the various species completes their life cycle within 4-5 months. Germination of various species starts during April-May with luxuriant vegetative growth. Majority of species bear flowers during July and August. Some species bear flowers during later part of June. Seed formation begins in later part of August and increase sharply up to September. Senescence at community level is gradual from September and increases quickly due to lower temperature. Thereafter different phenophases succeeded one after the other and completed their life history up to November.
Keywords:
Phenophases, Phenology, Sprouting, Senescence, Vegetative

Journal of Plant Development Sciences Vol. 4 (1) EVALUATION OF THE ANTIBACTERIAL ACTIVITY OF BARK OF LITCHI
CHINENSIS AGAINST ESCHERICHIA COLI, A UTI CAUSING ORGANISM
V.K. Deshwal *1, K. Vig 1, S.B. Singh 1 and P.D. Devi 2
1Doon (P.G.) Paramedical College, Dehradun-248 001, Uttarakhand, India 2Doon (P.G.) College of Agriculture Science and Technology, Dehradun-248 007, Uttarakhand, India *corresponding author and Email ID: vishal_deshwal@rediffmail.com Abstract: Main focus of present study was to screen the UTI patients, classification of patient on the basis of sex, age and
antimicrobial activity of different ethanol, aqueous extracts of bark of Litchi chinensis L. against Escherichia coli. Agar well
diffusion method was used to evaluate antibacterial activity against E. coli. Result suggested that Ethanol extract of Litchi
chinensis showes more antibacterial activity as compared to aqueous extract, and norfloxacin against E. coli. On the basis of
microbial count in urine sample, 30 out of 97 suspects were UTI positive. 70% females were UTI positive. Most infections
were seen in age group of 16-30yr in both male (13.3%) as well as female (30%). Ethanol extract (30mg/ml) showed 31.86%
more inhibition zone as compared to norfloxacin (30mg/ml). Aqueous extract (30mg/ml) also showed 23.56% more
inhibition zone as compared to norfloxacin (30mg/ml)
Keywords: Litchi chinensis, Antibacterial, E. coli, UTI
Journal of Plant Development Sciences Vol. 4 (1) EFFICIENCY OF UNTREATED AND TREATED DAIRY EFFLUENT ON
PHYSICO-CHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF THE SOIL
Gulfam Ali and M.K. Abdulla
Department of Botany, Kisan (P.G.) College, Simbhaoli-245207 (Panchsheel Nagar) U.P., INDIA. E-mail: gulfamali2010@gmail.com, dr.mkabdulla@gmail.com
Abstract
: Samples of untreated and treated dairy effluent were collected from Parag milk plant, Meerut. Three
concentrations (25, 50 and 100%) were used in this study. Tap water served as control. It was observed that soil pH
decreased non-significantly in all the treatments with effluent application as compared to control. However, Nitrogen,
Phosphorus and Potassium content of the soil increased significantly. Thus soil fertility improved in Integrated Nutrient
Management System (I.N.M.S.) and agro-ecosystem.

Keywords
: Brassica juncea, Meerut, Nitrogen, Phosphorus, Potassium
Journal of Plant Development Sciences Vol. 4 (1) ETHNOVETERINARY VALUES OF SOME PLANTS USED AGAINST SNAKE
BITE IN POONCH DISTRICT OF JAMMU AND KASHMIR (INDIA)
Jameel Ahmed Khan and Sudhir Kumar
Department of Botany Kisan (P.G.) College Simbhoali, Panchsheel (U P) Abstract: Poonch district of Jammu and Kashmir state possesses a rich history and culture of tribal society which have a
great wisdom of traditional knowledge with regard to medicinal plants for the treatment of their livestock . Survey was
conducted from January 2009 to December 2010 for the documentation of ethno veterinary plants used for snake bite
particularly to cows, Buffaloes and Horse with the help of village elders, key informants and local healers which indicated
that inhabitants of the valley utilize 22 species belonging to 16 genera and 12 families. The primary objective of the study
was to explore the floristic diversity and valuable folk medicinal plants because the knowledge is confined to only local
healers and it is important to record this knowledge for future generations which otherwise will be lost forever. Family
name, botanical name with local name in bract, parts used, method of preparation and mode of use is presented here.
Keywords: Against snake bite, Tradional knowledge
Journal of Plant Development Sciences Vol. 4 (1) BIOPROSPECTING ANTICARCINOGENIC POTENTIAL OF PLANTS IN
RAJASTHAN, INDIA
Lokendra Singh, Pracheta*, Veena Sharma and Ritu Paliwal
Department of Botany, Meerut College, Meerut, Uttar Pradesh, *Department of Biosciences & Biotechnology, Banasthali University, Rajasthan Abstract: Purpose of this communication is to report on the present status of anticarcinogenic plants of Rajasthan based on
folk lores, ethnobotanical , pharmacological and biochemical studies meant for more fruitful and directed future studies and
projects. An up to date account of antioxidants, antimutagens, detoxicants anti-inflammatory, antiproliferative, antimetasis
and antiangiogenic plants has been given.

Keywords
: Bioprospecting, Anticarcinogenic, Antioxidant plants, Rajasthan
Journal of Plant Development Sciences Vol. 4 (1) Short Communication
ROLE OF BIO-FERTILIZERS IN HORTICULTURAL CROPS
Sankara Rao Karri 
Department of Horticulture, Institute of Agricultural Science University of Calcutta, 35, Ballygunge Circular Road,
Abstract: The term bio‐fertilizer is made up of two words “Bio” means living and “Fertilizer” means a product that 
provides nutrients in usable form.  But as a product Bio‐fertilizer does not contain any significant quantity of nutrients 

itself.  It contains mainly live bacterial or fungal cells, which on application helps in fixing or solubilizing the nutrients 
present in air or in soil.  These are natural fertilizers.   


Keywords :
Bio-fertilizers, Horticultural crops
Journal of Plant Development Sciences Vol. 4 (1) Short Communication
PROBLEMS EXPERIENCED BY RURAL WOMEN ENTREPRENEURS
Aparna Jaiswal*, M.M. Patel** and P.C. Chaurasia***
Deptt. of Extension, Guru Ghasi Das University, Bilaspur (C.G.) Deptt. of Horticulture, Indira Ghandhi Krishi Vishwavidhyalaya, Raipur-492012 (C.G.)
Abstract:
The study was conducted in purposively selected block of Indore district of Madhya Pradesh during 2009-10 in
order to know the entrepreneurial behaviour of rural women in terms of their socio-economic, psychological and family
background attributes. The results of the study revealed that dual responsibility, lack of resources, poor family support, and
late payment by clients, mobility and marketing constraints were the major constraints perceived by majority of the rural
woman entrepreneurs.
Keywords : Indore, Rural women, Rural population
Journal of Plant Development Sciences Vol. 4 (1) Short Communication
POST HARVEST LIFE OF TUBEROSE AS INFLUENCE BY GA3 AND
VARIETIES
Priyanka Sharma and Anil Kumar Singh
Department of Horticulture, Institute of Agricultural Sciences Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005, India email: Sharma.of.priyanka@gmail.com Abstract: An experiment was conducted to evaluate the influence of GA3 and varieties on post harvest life
of tuberose. GA3 was applied to plants at two concentrations (GA3 100 and 200 ppm) along with control (distilled water). Varieties comprised of two single cultivars namely Sikkim Selection, Phule Rajani and two double cultivars namely Vaibhav and Calcutta Double. GA3 200 ppm produced pronounced affect on post harvest characters of tuberose. All the varieties exhibited significant differences for all the attributes.
Keywords: Tuberose, GA3, Cultivar, Growth, Yield.
Journal of Plant Development Sciences Vol. 4 (1) Short Communication
SCREENING OF OKRA GENOTYPES BASED ON LEAF SHAPE INDEX
Sankara Rao Karri and Pinaki Acharyya
Department of Horticulture, Institute of Agricultural Science University of Calcutta. 35, Ballygunge Circular Road,
Abstract: Okra [Abelmoschus esculentus (L.) Moench] is an important vegetable crop in the tropics and the subtropics. For
characterization of diverse okra genotypes morphological characters play an important role.
Keywords:
Abelmoschus esculentus, Genotypes, Okra
Journal of Plant Development Sciences Vol. 4 (1)

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Microsoft word - authentic_leadership060113.doc

TEAM INTERNATIONAL® INTERNATIONAL www. teaminternational.net What, Exactly, is Authentic Leadership? When I hear people talking about “authentic leadership”, I think about Jimmy Buffet, one of my favorite songwriters and singers, and his song “Fruitcakes”. In the song lyrics, he talks about relationships: “We all got ‘em, we all want ‘em, what do we do with them?

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